Updating our “right to be forgotten” Transparency Report

Tech News

In May 2014, in a landmark ruling, the European Court of Justice established the “right to be forgotten,” or more accurately, the “right to delist,” allowing Europeans to ask search engines to delist information about themselves from search results. In deciding what to delist, search engines like Google must consider if the information in question is “inaccurate, inadequate, irrelevant or excessive”—and whether there is a public interest in the information remaining available in search results.

Understanding how we make these types of decisions—and how people are using new rights like those granted by the European Court—is important. Since 2014, we’ve provided information about “right to be forgotten” delisting requests in our Transparency Report, including the number of URLs submitted to us, the number of URLs delisted and not delisted, and anonymized examples of some of the requests we have received.

New data in the Transparency Report

Today, we’re expanding the scope of our transparency reporting about the “right to be forgotten” and adding new data going back to January 2016 when our reviewers started manually annotating each URL submitted to us with additional information, including:

  • Requesters:We show a breakdown of the requests made by private individuals vs. non-private individuals—e.g., government officials or corporate entities.

  • Content of the request:We classify the content that the individual has asked us to delist into a set of categories: personal information, professional information, crime, and name not found, meaning that we were not able to find the individual’s name on the page.

  • Content of the site: When we evaluate a URL for potential delisting, we classify the website that hosts the page as a directory site, news site, social media, or other.

  • Content delisting rate:This is the rate at which we delist content by category on a quarterly basis.

Looking back: analyzing three years of delisting requests

In addition to updating the Transparency Report, we’re also providing a snapshot of our efforts to process these requests over the last three years.

This article was sourced from Google Blog

No Comments

Leave a Reply

Tech News
Redmi 5 in India, Vivo V9 and Oppo F7 Leaked, Galaxy S9 Goes on Sale, and More News This Week

Welcome back to our weekly news recap. One of the highlights this week was the launch of the Redmi 5 in India. Xiaomi has launched three variants of its latest smartphone, starting at Rs. 7,999 for the 2GB RAM/ 16GB storage variant. The 3GB/ 32GB variant of the Redmi 5 …

Tech News
Amid the greatest NCAA basketball upset ever, a Twitter hero emerges

Happy Saturday, everyone! While many things in the world are very bad today, if you were on the Internet last night, you probably caught wind of a pretty cool historic moment in college basketball: UMBC — University of Maryland, Baltimore County — knocked off the overall number one seed in …

Tech News
Qualcomm’s war may be over, but the casualties are just starting to be calculated

The epic battle between Qualcomm and Broadcom seems to have reached its armistice, with President Trump using the power of CFIUS to block the transaction this past week, ending what would have been the largest tech M&A transaction of all time. It may be all quiet on the semiconductor front, …